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Stark Family

This came from a third party.
1Richard Stark, b. abt. 1663 in Glascow, Scotland d: 1704 in York Co., Virginia  m. Rebecca [Unknown] d. 1713 in York Co., Virginia and had:
    2Catrene Stark b: Bet. 1692 – 1704
    2Mary Stark b: Bet. 1692 – 1704 m. [Unknown] Harris
    2William Stark b: Abt. 1691 d: 29 Feb 1756 in Prince George Co., Virginia; m/1 1713 Mary Whitby; m/2 25 Jan 1729/30 Mary Ann Bolling b: 25 Jan 1707/08  Bristol Parish, d. 1755 and had:
        3Rebecca Stark b: Bet. 1727 – 1731 m/1 John Ravenscroft b: in Scotland d: in Scotland; m/2 George McMurdo
        3Elizabeth Stark m. Robert Walker b. about 1744 in Dinwiddie, Virginia, d. 19 Oct 1797 Dinwiddie, Virginia
      3Bolling Stark b: 20 Sep 1733 in Prince George Co., Virginia, d: Jan 1788 in Richmond, Virginia; m/1 Elizabeth Belfield; m/2 Anna [Unknown] Orr
      3William Stark b: 1736 in Prince George Co., Virginia d: 19 Sep 1801 in Norfolk, Virginia m. Mary Bassett Daingerfield
      3Robert Stark b: Abt. 1738 in Prince George Co., Virginia; m/1 27 Feb 1758 Mary Hay; m/2 after 1780 Mary Hall [daughter of John Hall and Anne Bolling] d: August 1809 in Einchester, Virginia; m/3 after 1810 Grace Howell
        3Richard Stark b: 1740 in Prince George Co., Virginia d: July 1772 in Dinwiddle Co., Virginia m. Elizabeth [Unknown]
    2Richard Stark II b: Bet. 1692 – 1704 d: 1704
    2James Stark b: Bet. 1692 – 1704 d: 1704

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Wingfield Family

1Richard Stark, b. abt. 1663 in Glascow, Scotland d: 1704 in York Co., Virginia  m. Rebecca [Unknown] d. 1713 in York Co., Virginia and had:
    2Catrene Stark b: Bet. 1692 – 1704
    2Mary Stark b: Bet. 1692 – 1704 m. [Unknown] Harris
    2William Stark b: Abt. 1691 d: 29 Feb 1756 in Prince George Co., Virginia; m/1 1713 Mary Whitby; m/2 25 Jan 1729/30 Mary Ann Bolling  b: 25 Jan 1707/08  Bristol Parish, d. 1755 and had:
        3Rebecca Stark b: Bet. 1727 – 1731 m/1 John Ravenscroft b: in Scotland d: in Scotland; m/2 George McMurdo
        3Elizabeth Stark m. Robert Walker  b. about 1744 in Dinwiddie, Virginia, d. 19 Oct 1797 Dinwiddie, Virginia
      3Bolling Stark b: 20 Sep 1733 in Prince George Co., Virginia, d: Jan 1788 in Richmond, Virginia; m/1 Elizabeth Belfield; m/2 Anna [Unknown] Orr
      3William Stark b: 1736 in Prince George Co., Virginia d: 19 Sep 1801 in Norfolk, Virginia m. Mary Bassett Daingerfield
      3Robert Stark b: Abt. 1738 in Prince George Co., Virginia; m/1 27 Feb 1758 Mary Hay; m/2 after 1780 Mary Hall [daughter of John Hall and Anne Bolling] d: August 1809 in Einchester, Virginia; m/3 after 1810 Grace Howell
        3Richard Stark b: 1740 in Prince George Co., Virginia d: July 1772 in Dinwiddle Co., Virginia m. Elizabeth [Unknown]
    2Richard Stark II b: Bet. 1692 – 1704 d: 1704
    2James Stark b: Bet. 1692 – 1704 d: 1704

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General Winfield Scott

General Winfield Scott was the youngest of the Scott siblings and was brother to my 4th great-grandmother Ann Scott who married Major Theodorick Walker. (The name “Winfield”, by the way, was originally “Wingfield” and is from a family surname.) Both Winfield and Ann were born in Laurel Branch, Virginia, the Scott family plantation.

The Scott family hailed from the Buccleuch Clan of Scotland. James Scott, the grandfather of Winfield and Ann, was the son of landed gentry but fought against the English Crown at the Battle of Culloden. He was smuggled to America by friends from a ship sailing from Bristol. His son William became a captain during the American war for independence. During the War Between the States, Winfield Scott remained with the North, and the rest of the family strongly supported the South.

Ann Scott, though 12 years older than Winfield, outlived him and was remembered as a woman in her 80s spinning and weaving cotton for the Southern cause. She died at the age of 92. I am told that many of the women on that side were around six feet tall. (Okay, so what went wrong with me, you ask.) Makes sense as Winfield was said to be six-feet five inches tall.

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Scott Family

1James Scottof the clan of Buccleuch    2William Scott m. Ann Mason had:

        3James Scott b. 24 Feb 1777, d. 1841 m. Martha Pegram

        3Mary Mason Scott b. 1772, d. 1838, m. Theodoric Scott

        3Rebecca Scott b. 1770, d.  b. 1770 m. Edward Henry Pegram

        3Elizabeth Scott b. 1767, d. 1836, m. Joseph Wells Harper

        3Martha Scott b. 1783 m. Judge Thomas Field

        3Ann Scott b. 1775 in Dinwiddie Co., VA, d. 1872, Lee Co., Mississippi; m. in 1802 Maj. Theodorick Walker
            4Martha Ann Walker m. John Fisher
            4Louisa E. Walker m. Albert H. Raymond and had:
                5Emily H. Raymond
                5Samuel P. Raymond
                5Mary B. Raymond
                5John H. Raymond
                5William C. Raymond
                5Modeste C. Raymond m. Robert L. Trice and had:
                    6William W. Trice

        3Gen. John Winfield Scott b. June 13, 1786 Dinwiddie Co., Virginia, d. 29 May 1866 at West Point, New York;  m/1 [Miss Baker]; m/2 Maria Mayo and had:
            4Maria Mayo Scott d. 1833
            4John Mayo Scott b. 18 Apr. 1819, d. 1820
            4Virginia Scott b. 1821, d. 1845
            4Edward Winfield Scott 23 March 1823, d. 1827
            4Cornelia Scott b. 1825, m. Henry Lee Scott
            4Adeline Camilla Scott b. 1831, m. Goold Hoyt
            4Marcella Scott b. 21 Jan. 1834 m. [Unknown] McTavish

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 THE FISHERS AND THE BOLDINGS: A CONFEDERATE FAMILY IN VERONA, MISSISSIPPI

By

Kathryn L. Brogdon

Copyright 2003

All rights reserved.

The Family Background

The earliest members of the 19th-century Fisher-Bolding family known to have settled in Mississippi were Maj. Theodorick Walker[1] and his wife Ann Scott[2].  Their own story reaches back into Virginia and will be addressed at a later time, but the present chapter covers the descendants of their daughter, Martha Ann Walker, and her husband John Fisher.[3]  Details of the Fisher-Bolding family of 19th-century Mississippi remain obscure, except for the fact that their relatives included physicians, lawyers, military men and planters.  This fact alone indicates that they must have been educated people of some standing in the communities where they lived.

Census records indicate that John Fisher, justice of the peace for many years in Monroe Co., Mississippi, was born in North Carolina,[4] although how and why he ended up in Mississippi remains a mystery.  His father-in-law, Theodorick Walker, had distinguished himself in the War of 1812, and his wife’s uncle, Gen. Winfield Scott, became the greatest military commander in United States history.  There were also an amazing number of physicians among Martha Ann’s Walker relations—at least fourteen in a period spanning about three generations.  John and Martha Ann’s eldest daughter, Elizabeth, later married a physician herself, James P. Bolding, whose family origins remain unknown.

Although we do not know exactly when or why the Walkers, Fishers and Boldings settled in Mississippi, we do know that white settlement was opening up in the Chickasaw lands during the early 19th century just before their arrival.

Monroe County was originally embraced within the Chickasaw Indian 
territory, and, by the treaty of Chickasaw Council House, concluded 
September 20, 1816, that nation ceded to the United States 408,000 acres 
on their eastern or Creek frontier.  This large tract lay upon the 
eastern tributaries of the upper Tombigbee river and comprised the 
original “county of Monroe.”  The Creek claims to these lands were 
surrendered by the treaty of Fort Jackson.  It was attached to the state 
of Alabama until the winter of 1820, when the boundary was determined by 
actual survey, and on February 9, 1821, the legislature of Mississippi 
recognized it as within the limits of the State and approved a law 
entitled, “An act to form a county east of the Tombigby [sic] river, and for 

other purposes,” which defined its limits…[5]

John Fisher is listed among justices of the peace for Monroe Co. for the years 1822-1827.[6]  He was definitely in Monroe Co. by 1824 during which year he became a surety for a bond originated by one John Dexter in that county.  After Dexter became Assessor and Collector of Taxes in 1826, John Fisher administered his oath of office.[7]

               John Fisher remained in Monroe Co. for a number of years, and his children were apparently born there in Aberdeen.[8]  His family, however, had shifted to the town of Verona in Pontotoc Co. by 1850.  John Fisher was listed as a farmer[9] on the census record that year.  He must have been dead by 1860, for by the time that census was taken, Martha Ann was recorded as head of household in his stead and her occupation was listed as “farmer.”[10]  Although the census recorded her age wrong, she can be recognized by the presence of the same children of the 1850 household still residing with her in 1860.

More recently, John Fisher has been “resurrected” by a historical researcher, Kerry M. Armstrong, because of the landmark Fisher v. Allen trial he was involved in when he still lived in Monroe Co.  This suit involved the laws of the Chickasaw Nation and the legal identity of a woman named Elizabeth or Betsey Love or even possibly Elizabeth Allen, depending on the point of view.  Fisher had filed suit on one James Allen for defaulting on a promise,[11] supposing this man to have been the husband of Betsey Love.  Fisher had previously drafted a legal document for this part-Chickasaw woman, only to regret his part in it.

On November 2, 1830, a Deed of Gift of slaves from Elizabeth Love to Sally Allen and others was filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s office.  It purported to be dated November 14, 1829.  In the document Elizabeth names her children Sally Allen, George Allen, Alexander Allen, Mississippi Allen, Louisiana Allen, Susan Allen, Tennessee Allen, Polly Allen, Elizabeth Allen, and Samuel Allen.  Among the slaves given, Susan Allen is to receive a slave named Tony.  One of the witnesses listed to the document was “John L. Allen, sub-agent for the Chickasaws.”[12]  It is this gift to daughter Susan Allen of the slave Tony that forms the basis for the noted Fisher v. Allen lawsuit.  The fact that John L. Allen was a witness to this deed is the extent of his recorded involvement with this case.[13]

Armstrong remarks that:

Betsy Love Allen is most remembered for her role in the landmark Mississippi court case which first upheld the right of a woman to manage her own separate property apart from her husband’s control.  It is this very case which lead to the error in asserting that she was married to John L. Allen.  It is a classic case where a [sic] error made by a [sic] unknown clerk in transcribing and digesting a court record, has apparently changed the true facts of history.[14]

Armstrong surmises that, “In all probability, and after all the facts about the case are considered the November 14, 1829, date on the Deed of Gift was probably a fraudulent date which later backfires on the probable drafter of the instrument.”  Armstrong believes that John Fisher devised the document to hide the Allen family assets:

         The Fisher v. Allen case actually begins with an earlier lawsuit for debt, Alexander Malcom v. James Allen.[15]  Malcom sued James Allen stating that on October 30, 1784, Allen executed document to Malcom for “five thousand pounds current money of the state of North Carolina” in exchange for Allen’s promise to convey to Malcom a certain tract of land in Tennessee.[16]

         Apparently, Allen defaulted on his promise and so in November of 1829, Malcom filed suit against James Allen in the Monroe Circuit Court.  James Allen was served with the papers on April 10, 1830, and the case was set for trial in the November term of 1830.

         To represent himself, James Allen hired John Fisher,[17] an attorney and Justice of the Peace of Monroe County, Mississippi.  It would appear that as a part of representing James Allen, Fisher drafted the Betsy Love Deed of Gift, and used her maiden name to help hide the family assets of slaves.  In order to obtain Fisher’s services in the Malcom lawsuit, James Allen executed a promissory note to Fisher, on September 16, 1830, in the amount of two hundred dollars payable on or before November 1, 1830.  It is during this time period between September 16, 1830 and November 1830, that it is believed that the Deed of Gift was actually drafted.  This belief is bolstered by the fact that the required acknowledgement of the witnesses John L. Allen and Gabriel W. Long is dated November 2, 1830, and that same was made before “John Fisher, JP.”

         As Fisher apparently drafted the instrument, he could not later repudiate it or its supposed date of execution in his later lawsuit with Susan Allen, which was essentially based on this Deed of Gift.  Thus if Fisher had been a part of an attempt to defraud the creditors of James Allen in the Malcom suit by this document, it would later backfire on him in his suit.

         In any event, James Allen defaulted on this obligation as well, and in November 1830, Fisher promptly filed suit against James Allen.  This was the first Fisher v. Allen lawsuit.  The court records style the case, John Fisher v. James Allen.[18]  Allen was served with the papers on April 11, 1831, by Sheriff’s deputy David Vaughn,[19] and the case was set for trial on May 3, 1831.  James Allen, for whatever reason failed to appear in court for the trial of the lawsuit and Fisher took a default judgment against him for $208.08 in damages and $23.24 court costs.[20]

         As a result of this default judgment, Fisher immediately took out a Writ of Execution on the default judgment which directed John Dexter, sheriff of Monroe County, to seize upon any property of James Allen to be found and sell same at a public sale to satisfy Fisher’s judgment against James Allen.  Dexter had the slave “Toney” seized as the property of James Allen to be sold to satisfy the judgment.[21]  It is at this moment in time that the famous Fisher v. Allen lawsuit begins.  The style of the case was more properly, John Fisher v. Susan Allen.[22]

John Fisher lost this case, by the way.  Herein, the reader is offered a “primer” into the case with this reprint of its first court order:

John Fisher v Case James Allen

The State of Mississippi.

To the sheriff of Monroe County Greetings — We Command you to take the body of James Allen if to be found in your County and him safely keep so that you have his body before the Judge of our Circuit Court to be holden for the County aforesaid at the court house in said County on the first Monday of May next then and there to answer John Fisher of a plea of trespass on the case to his damage three hundred dollars.  Herein fail not and have then there this writ.

Witness the honorable Isaac R. Nicholson presiding Judge of the fifth Judicial Circuit for the State of Mississippi the first Monday of November 1830 and the 55th year of the American Independence.

Issued the 23rd day of March 1831.

Attest Stephen Cocke CK By his Deputy S.H. Buckingham

This action is founded on a promissory note executed by the defendant on the 16th day of September 1830 to secure the payment to the plaintiff or order two hundred dollars for his attention and service in a suit of Alexander Malcom against the said defendant on or before the first day of November next, after the date of said promissory note.  The plaintiff having filed his declaration at the time of issuing the writ.  Judgment will be required at the return term.  No Bail required.

Stephen Cocke Clerk

Came to hand the 5 April 1831, and Executed 11th April 1831, by leaving a true copy of the within writ with the within named defendant and travel 198 miles.

John Dexter Sheriff By his Deputy David M. VaughnBetsey Love’s original Deed of Gift not only set the stage for the court case to follow, but it also offers a rare glimpse into the institution of slavery among the Chickasaw people:

Elizabeth Love
Deed To
Sally Allen et al

Know all men by these Presents that I Elizabeth Love of The Chickasaw Nation from natural love and affection and other good causes me here unto moving do hereby voluntarily give grant alienate in fee off and confirm unto my children the following property (viz.) 1st To my beloved daughter Sally Allen the following Slaves (viz.) Mary Ann a negro woman age about 20 years and her Children (viz.) Minny Edward and Violet.  Bill a negro Boy age about 18 years and Ruthy a child about 14 years.  2nd to my beloved son George Allen the following named Slaves to wit Charlotte a negro woman aged about 30 years and her child Joshua also Josiah a Boy commonly called Sy.  3rd To my beloved son Alexander Allen the following Slaves (viz.) Callus a Boy aged about 18 years and John a Boy aged 15 years.  4th To my Beloved Daughter Mississippi Allen the following Slaves (viz.) Anika a negro Girl aged about 18 years and Louis a negro Boy aged about 12 years.  5th To my daughter Louisiana Allen the following Slaves (viz.) Sandy a negro boy aged 10 years and Dely a negro Girl aged about 8 years.  6th To my beloved Daughter Susan Allen the following Slaves (viz.) Toney a negro boy aged about 8 years and Delphia a negro Girl aged about 6 years.  7th To my beloved Daughter Tennessee Allen the following Slaves (viz.) Sam a negro boy 5 years and Dave a negro boy aged about 5 years.  8th My beloved Daughter Polly Allen the following Slaves (viz.) Emanuel a negro boy aged about 2 years and Nelly a negro about forty years.  9th To my beloved Daughter Elizabeth Allen the following named Slaves (viz.) George a negro man aged about 45 years and Richard a negro woman aged about 45 . . . Years.  10th To my beloved Son Samuel Allen the following Slaves (viz.) Bill a negro man aged about 50 years and Sinica a man aged about 35 years.  To have and to hold the said slaves to them and their heirs forever.  And I the said Elizabeth Love do hereby revoke all former gifts or grants of said Slaves and do by these presents confirm the Same to my children in the manner above structured detail.  To the end that they may enjoy all the advantages proffits or Benefits accruing or to accrue from said property.  In testamony whereof I have hereunto affixed my hand and Seal this 14th day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand eight and twenty nine.

Her Betsy X Love {seal} Mark

Witness Present John L. Allen Sub Agent for the Chickasaws

G. W. Long

Martin Colbert

The State of Mississippi
Monroe County

Personally appeared John L. Allen and Gabriel W. Long before me the undersigned Justice of the Peace for said county and made oath that they saw Betsy Love Sign Seal and deliver the above Deed of conveyance and for the purposes therein expressed and that they together with Martin Colbert Subscribing Witnesses. Sworn to and Subscribed before me the 2nd day of November 1830.[23]

The following account is the line of this same John Fisher’s family[24] whose descendants stretch into present-day Texas:

The Fisher Family Line

A. John Fisher[25] b. about 1795 North Carolina,[26] m. 4 Dec. 1823[27] in Monroe Co., Mississippi, to Martha Ann Walker[28] b. Aug. 27, 1808 Virginia.[29]

1.      Elizabeth L. Fisher b. 22 Dec. 1828, m. to James P. Bolding, a physician, on 22 May 1849.[30]

2.      Ellen Fisher[31]b. about 1836, m. 25 Dec 1856 to Benjamin F. McWhorter[32] in Pontotoc, Mississippi.

a.       Ila McWhorter.

b.      Mary McWhorter.[33]

c.       James McWhorter.[34]

3.      Platt Bull Fisher[35] b. 2 May 1840 Monroe Co., d. 21 June 1863 in Upperville, Va.

4.      Alfred P. Fisher[36] b. about 1842 (believed to be the one on the Hill Co., Texas, marriage record who m. N.W.J. Davis[37] on 25 Nov 1875), d. unknown.

5.      Henrietta Fisher[38] b. 3 Feb. 1844, m. to James M. Johnson.[39]

a.       William Johnson.[40]

b.      Elizabeth Johnson.[41]

c.       [Thomas] Johnson.[42]

6.      Emily Fisher[43] b. 27 May 1846, m. first Frank Cockrell.[44]

a.       Edgar Cockrell[45] of San Antonio, Texas.

She m. secondly Wilson Bailey[46] of San Antonio, Texas.

b.      Hattie Bailey.

c.       Georgia Bailey.

d.      Rosa Bailey.

e.       Jessie Bailey.

f.        Julian Bailey.

g.       Fisher Bailey.

h.       Raymond Bailey.[47]

 Our evidence for Elizabeth Fisher Bolding being of the household of John Fisher and Martha Ann Walker is scant apart from the account in “The Walker Family” by Lee Nicholson that appeared in Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Vol. XIV, 1933.  She was apparently the eldest child of the Fishers and had left home by the time the U.S. 1850 census was taken.  This was the first national census to list children of households.  Proof of Elizabeth’s connection to the Fisher family may be found in a deed of gift originated by her father John Fisher as follows:

Deed of Gift

John Fisher

to

Elizabeth Bolding

Know all persons by these presents that for the love and affection which I John Fisher of the County of Pontotoc of the State of Mississippi have and bear my Daughter Elizabeth Bolding the wife of James P. Bolding of the County of the State aforesaid I have this day [given], granted and conveyed and by these presents do give grant and convey to her and the natural heirs of her body […] fully begotten a negro Girl a slave for life by the name of Amanda aged ten years past and in the event of the death of the said Elizabeth or of the failure of issue of her body then and in either of these cases the said girl and her natural increase if any is to go to the interest and [being] of my other children the right and title to which girl do hereby warrant to her and her said heirs as aforesaid.  Given under my hand and seal this the 10th day of June 1850.

                                                                                  John Fisher [seal]

The State of Mississippi

Pontotoc County [S. S.]

Personally appeared this day John Fisher before me John Sullivan, an acting Justice of the Peace in and for said county and acknowledged that he signed and sealed the above deed of gift for the purpose therein expressed.  Given under my hand and seal this the 15th day of June 1850.

                                                                                  John Sullivan [seal]

                                                                                  Justice of the Peace

The deed of gift of which the rest foregoing is a true copy was received in my office for record on the 22nd day of June A.D. 1850 and that the same was duly recorded the same day.

                                                                                  P. C. Earle clerk

 Although the Fishers had moved to Pontotoc from Monroe by this time, they must have lived very near the county line of Itawamba.  At least two of their children schooled there in the old town of Richmond.

            Old Richmond in its early years was a part of Itawamba County.  The town grew quickly, becoming a trade center and a stopping point for travelers by wagon and stagecoach.
Old Richmond’s Main Street started on what is now Road 814 in front of Lamont Posey’s home and curved to the northeast. Posey [1972] said there were at least 12 stores in Old Richmond owned by merchants named Williams, Murphy, Threlkeld, Crane, Thomas, Stovall, Randolph, Evans, Pettigrew, Raymond, Walker, Roberts, and Westmoreland.
“This was the center of activity,” said Posey, a Social Security judge who two years ago moved from Jackson back home to Richmond.  “It had to be one of the busiest towns around.”
On the south end of Main Street were a hotel, the Webb shop and woodworking business, the Baptist church (formed in 1845), a girls academy and a Masonic lodge.  On the north end, there were a boys academy as well as a saloon and dance hall to entertain visitors.  Nearby there were a gin, grist mill and store operated by the Shumpert family.[48]

 Judging by Masonic records of Lodge No. 97, Elizabeth Fisher’s husband-to-be, James P. Bolding, was also living there at that time, as well as her uncle-by-marriage, Alfred Hoyt Raymond,[49] who had married her aunt, Louisa Walker.[50]  James P. Bolding and Alfred Raymond were both members of the same Lodge in Richmond.[51]  The Lodge met in a second story added to the site of the local boys’ academy, which had taken over the premises previously used by the girls’ academy.  The building was later moved to Evergreen, a town in southeast Itawamba Co.[52]Alfred Raymond’s name appears as a surety on the marriage license between James P. Bolding and Elizabeth Fisher.[53]  The fact that Elizabeth’s uncle’s name appears on it instead of her father’s gives cause to speculate about John Fisher’s whereabouts during all of these proceedings.  John Fisher was still alive by 1850; perhaps he was ill and later died.  This Alfred Raymond must have been a very popular member of the family.  Although he was probably no blood relation to any of the Fishers (having been born in New York), he was apparently so well loved that his name carried down through several branches of the family.  Elizabeth’s youngest brother was apparently named for him, and the Raymond surname still survives to this day as a given name among the Raymond and Fisher descendants. Elizabeth Fisher had another brother, Platt Bull Fisher, whose life was cut short in the Confederate service.  As far as is known, he never married or had children. Platt’s service in the cavalry was apparently supported wholeheartedly by his family who spoke little of him in the years after Reconstruction.  As of 2002, he was honored in the registry of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, which is a historical and charitable organization whose purpose is to preserve the memory of Southern soldiers, their history, and their culture.  Persons proving collateral descent from Platt Fisher are eligible for membership in the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Sons of Confederate Veterans or Children of the Confederacy.[54]

Both Platt and Alfred schooled in Richmond at Martin’s Academy.  Many years after the War Between the States, Col. W. L. Clayton, a former resident of Richmond remembered his old classmates:

I would like very much to include in these Pen Pictures a history of all the young men with whom I went to school at the old Martin Academy, tracing their lives through the intervening years, and see what kind of a workman Capt. Martin proved to be. But I cannot do this to my own satisfaction, and I feel that it would not do justice to the dead of them, nor prove satisfactory to the living, who might read these lines. I will, therefore, only undertake to say a few words about them.  They were a very fine set of boys.  No trouble was ever given by any of them to the master, nor the trustees, and peace and good fellowship reigned between themselves. . . . There were two of the Fisher boys, Platt Bull Fisher, but the christian [sic] name of the other has escaped me.  I have learned that one or both of these boys was killed in the war.[55] [Author’s note:  Only Platt was killed, but Alfred also served.]  Judging by Col. Clayton’s description of their male teacher, he must have made a strong mark on the minds of his pupils: When the tocsin of war sounded, Henry Martin, the teacher of the old Male Academy, but who had then gone into the mercantile business, was living happily in the bosom of his family at Richmond . . . but he raised a company, and was elected its captain, and entered the service of the Confederacy, and offered up his life upon her altar.  If my memory serves me right, he was not killed in battle, but sickened and died in the service.  But nevertheless, he was and is as truly a hero as if he had died on the field of conflict.[56] Col. Clayton also remembered Alfred Raymond, the uncle of the Fisher children (although it is not clear in this passage whether he was aware of their relationship): Some merchants only last for a season, and many only for a little longer time. But in old Richmond in 1855, there was a firm of merchants doing business then under the name of Raymond and Trice, composed of Alfred H. Raymond and Robert L. Trice, and they continued their business there until the Mobile and Ohio Rail Road was built, and then moved themselves to Verona, where they were connected in business in one way or another till the death of Mr. Raymond, and now a son of each is engaged together in business in the town of Tupelo, under the firm name of Trice Raymond Hardware Co.  I dealt with Raymond and Trice from 1855, more or less, for many years and I must say I never dealt with more square and accommodating gentlemen than they; and then when you owed them and could not pay, all they asked of you was good faith and an honest effort to pay, and they would indulge you as long as you could ask.  They collected their debts without suit, and you always thought, in dealing with them, you were in the house of your friends.  When I went to Richmond, I was not quite nineteen, a poor boy without means, and even having no money with which to pay board, clothing and books, and I must say the merchants and those with whom I boarded treated me superbly, and Raymond and Trice were among them, for they all sold me on credit. . . [Trice married Raymond’s daughter, Modeste.[57]  Ann Scott Walker later lived with this Trice family.[58]]   

The Fisher Boys in Confederate Service

Platt Fisher enrolled for active service in the Confederate Army March 16, 1861, at Okolona, Mississippi, for a period of 12 months.  By the next New Year’s Eve, he found himself in a hospital in Danville, Virginia, with a case of the mumps.  The next day, he was placed in another hospital in Richmond, Virginia, with a different diagnosis—rheumatism.  By January 8th, he was ready to serve again, and it was a distinguished, but short career he was to have as a soldier.[59]

In the Chickahominy campaign, or seven days’ battles, Colonel Martin[60] had command of his battalion, the Fourth Virginia cavalry and Pelham’s artillery.  It was a period of constant fighting, in which the cavalry performed deeds of reckless daring.  First, on crossing the Chickahominy, Martin took an advanced position on the South Anna, which effectually covered from McClellan the movement of Jackson’s army against his flank.  Then, when Jackson came up, they advanced with him to Cold Harbor.  In the course of the daring raid to cut the York River Railroad, Captain Avery’s company (Co. C) was dismounted, and with one of the Virginia companies and two of Pelham’s guns, attacked and drove away a gunboat near the White House, where the Federal General in a panic was destroying his vast Collection of army supplies. . . . Lieutenant Fisher, with fourteen men of Company B, captured a company of the Bucktail regiment, nearly sixty men.[61]

Shortly after, Platt survived the fighting at Gettysburg before facing his final battle in Virginia, a few miles outside of Washington, D.C.

The [Jeff Davis] legion shared in the important service of Stuart’s cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign, losing out of their small number 12 killed and 44 wounded.  In the hand-to-hand fighting of July 3, the most important cavalry battle of the war, up to that time, General Hampton was twice wounded and Major W. G. Conner, of the legion, was killed.  At Fleetwood, July 9, after the return to Virginia, they were also distinguished.  Lieut. P. B. Fisher and Private William Frew, Company F, and Private G. W. Seals, Company B, were killed at Upperville, in this campaign.[62]

 Alfred served for the duration of the War.  Like Platt, he enlisted himself and his own horse in the cavalry and entered as a private in Company A of the 4th Battalion Mississippi Cavalry.  He was later promoted to the rank of corporal in Company C, 8th (Wade’s) Confederate Cavalry, 2nd Regiment, Mississippi and Alabama Cavalry.  After making the rank of sergeant, he was sent out to recruit during the months of January and February of 1864.  At the end of that time, he was granted a 25-day furlough, but had not returned as scheduled.  The reason was apparent after he was released as a prisoner of war in Memphis, Tennessee, 20 June 1863.[63]  Alfred returned home but whether he had already been informed of Platt’s death, we cannot tell.  Little has passed down to us of the Fisher family’s doings during the days of Reconstruction.   

The Bolding Family

While the story of the War Between the States is still fresh on our minds, it seems good to note what is believed to be the story of the Bolding family during the War.  During the time that Dorothy M. Cross collected information on the family, she received a written account from her brother Harry R. Morse Jr. of all that he recalled of the Fisher and Bolding families from their grandmother Amelia Bolding:         [James][64] Bolding was a medical doctor and Elizabeth Fisher was much younger than he was.  One day when he was just starting his practice he saw her and remarked that some day he was going to marry her.  She was just a girl at the time. In due course he did just that, he married her.”[65]           They lived south of Tupelo, Mississippi, in a town that no longer exists that was south of the little town of Plantersville.[66]  One of  Elizabeth’s sisters married a McQuirter [McWhorter] and there are quite a number of McQuirters in that region today.  In the fall of 1965, I lived in Indianapolis, Indiana.  I came to Texas on my vacation and took Dad and Mother back with me to Indianapolis.  Since we would go through Tupelo, Mississippi, anyway, we spent the night there and Dad called around until he found some of the McQuirters.  We went out and spent the day with them and two old maid school teachers came over.  Dad had met them on a visit that they made to Texas when he was just a child.  They were well up in their 80s at that time.  I do not remember all the named and did not record them.  They were a hardy bunch.  Some of them were in their 70s but could have passed for being 20 to 25 years younger.

While Elizabeth Fisher’s brothers were off fighting, her husband Dr. James P. Bolding was said to have been off helping the troops and was captured at one point.  He probably served as a civilian doctor, being about 45 years old at the War’s outbreak.  No records have been uncovered as of yet to support or disclaim the story.  Two possible reasons for this are:  1) records of civilian prisoners were generally not kept, and 2) civilian doctors often worked under contract to the government and were never listed in government records.  Continuing on with the Morse account:

James and Elizabeth Bolding were plantation owners and slave holders.  He was also a doctor in the Confederacy during the Civil War.  He was taken prisoner, I think, at the battle of Corinth, Mississippi.  His family knew that he was a prisoner because some Yankee officer came riding up on his horse.  Their house was not burned and their plantation [was] not destroyed because it was used as a headquarters by a Yankee general.  Grandmother [Amelia Bolding] told about how that “Yankee general” took her up on his knee and talked to her when she was six years old.  Checking the best historical records that could be located, [I found] that there was no Yankee general in that area, so he must not have been a general.  To a six-year-old girl a captain might appear to be pretty important.

The War seems to have become a family business for the Boldings and the Fishers.  Elizabeth Fisher’s uncle, Gen. Winfield Scott,[67] had thrown in his lot with the Union forces, while most of his family had remained with the South.  His sister, Ann Scott Walker,[68] Elizabeth’s grandmother, lived then with Alfred Raymond’s family.[69]  This Ann Scott Walker, at the age of 87, was said to have been spinning and weaving cloth for Confederate uniforms when her grandson Dr. Thomas Jefferson Scott, then serving with the Confederate Army, paid her a visit while he was stationed near there.[70]  She outlived her 12-year younger brother Winfield, dying in her 98th year in 1872.

The family of James P. Bolding is believed to have owned about thirty slaves, but few details are known outside the notes of Dorothy M. Cross.  The source of her notes is unclear.  One of them tells how, on one occasion, the doctor hid in a cane field as Union troops passed through Verona.  One of his slaves tried to point him out to them, presumably to no avail, for the doctor was not captured until later.  Random notes also indicate the outrage of the Boldings upon hearing about another slave-holding family who greased the mouth of a young slave boy to make it appear that he had just eaten when they had not fed him at all. Better known family stories recount how the Boldings let their slaves go after the War, but not until the Bolding women first taught their female slaves how to manage a home.  It was said that after the War, an ex-Bolding slave would sometimes knock on the door in the middle of the night looking for work and a place to stay, but there was no provision.

One family member commented:

            My mother’s knowledge of the slaves came from stories her grandma Amy [Amelia Bolding] told her.  She used to love to sit and listen to her grandma’s stories.  I remember her telling me some of the stories when I was little, but can’t really remember much in the way of details.  One story I do remember.  My mother related an event that happened when she was young (and I don’t know how old she was, but I believe Amelia died when she was in her teens and obviously this occurred after Amelia had come to live with them).            An old black man came to their house looking for Miss Amy. He had been a slave in her household when she was a little girl.  He had played with her and taken care of her and they had a fondness for each other when they were young.  He remembered her fondly and had heard she was in the area.  Mother said that they reminisced for a long time and then he went away.  He returned periodically and did work for Amelia like running errands, going to the bank, finding things for her and such.  He liked doing these things and Amelia enjoyed his company and the attention.            That’s about all I remember, I used to know his name, but it is gone now.  But, the family definitely owned slaves.[71] Alfred Fisher is credited with making the way for the Bolding family to come to Texas, as he arrived there first, probably somewhere between 1870-75.  We know that he purchased the collective family inheritance of land received from John Fisher, and we assume that this had something to do with the family’s hard times after the War.[72]  Harry R. Morse Jr. relates their situation:            After the Civil War they sold the plantation because Elizabeth’s brother [Alfred Fisher] suggested that they do so and then come to Texas.  They did sell the plantation, were paid in full and sewed the money into the little girl’s [sic] petticoats (there were about six of them [little girls]) to prevent its being stolen.  They got to Texas without any trouble and settled in Hill County where “Brother”[73] lived.  They deposited the money in two banks, both of which went broke about a week apart.  “Brother” had money in one of these banks and he lost his money, too.  He paid a visit to the banker with a pistol in his hand and they went down and got his money; so he recovered his money.  However, Dr. [James] and Elizabeth Bolding did not.[74] The family stories did not tell exactly what the arrangements were for the sale of the land in Mississippi.  Some members were surprised later upon learning that Alfred himself purchased all of the land from John Fisher’s estate.  During the 1870s, Alfred was buying and selling land in Hill Co., Texas, and it may be that some connection between that activity and the Boldings’ move to Texas will become clearer in time.  (It is worth noting that the Boldings disappeared from the 1870 Mississippi Census, but have not been located either in Texas nor Alabama at that time.  Alabama was suggested as a point of departure in Dorothy M. Cross’ notes, but this has never been substantiated.  Her notes also referred to a boat called “The Queen of New Orleans” sailing from Mobile, but again, this has not definitely been connected with the Boldings’ departure from the Deep South.  The common family story says they took a barge from New Orleans to Galveston and that the barge sank on the trip back.)  The following is a transcription of the Bolding-Fisher land sales to Alfred Fisher.  (Note that the section of Pontotoc that included their lands was part of the newly formed Lee Co., in honor of Robert E. Lee.)J. P. Bolding et al. To: DeedA. P. Fisher This Indenture made and entered into this the 13th day of November A.D. 1869, Between J. P. Bolding & Elizabeth Bolding wife of the said J. P., Henrietta Fisher & C. W. Cockerham parties of the first part and A. P. Fisher Party of the Second Part all of the County of Lee of State of Mississippi.  Witnesseth that for and in consideration of the sum of Three Hundred Dollars cash in hand paid by the said A. P. Fisher to the parties of the first the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, the said parties of the second part doth grant, bargain, sell & convey and do hereby grant, bargain, sell, convey & quit claim unto the said A. P. Fisher his heirs and assigns forever all Right, Title, and Interest either in Law or Equity to the following described Lands being Interested in the said Lands as Legatees of the late John Fisher namely the North East quarter of Section Fourteen and the East half of the NorthWest quarter of the same Section all in Township ten (10) Range Five (5) East of the Bassin [Missourian] Chickasaw Survey making in all two hundred & forty acres of Land, more or less together with all of the appurtenances thereunto annexed to have and to hold the same hereby granted, bargained & sold Land from the parties of the first part to the said A. P. Fisher his heirs forever the title in fee Simple.  In testimony of the above I hereunto affixe my name and Seal the day and date first above written.                                      C. W. Cockerham [seal]                                     Henrietta Fisher [seal]                                     J. P. Bolding [seal]                                     E. L. Bolding [seal] State of MississippiLee County      Personally appeared before me [Geo.] S. Tankerley Justice of the Peace in and for the said county J. P. Bolding, Elizabeth Bolding wife of the said J. P., Henrietta Fisher & C. W. Cockerham heirs at law of the late John Fisher who acknowledges they signed, sealed, and delivered the within Deed to A. P. Fisher for purposes therein contained as their own voluntary act and deed.  In testimony above, I hereunto affix my name and seal this the 13th day of November A.D. 1869,                       George Tankerley [seal]                      Justice of the Peace State of MississippiLee CountyPersonally appeared before me John S. Ratliff Mayor of Verona and Ex-officio Justice of the peace in and for said county of State aforesaid.  James P. Bolding whose signature appears to the foregoing Deed acknowledges that he signed, sealed and delivered the same for the purposes therein specified, also E. L. Bolding wife of J. P. Bolding being by me examined separate and apart from her said husband acknowledges that she signed the same as her voluntary act without any fear, threat, or compulsion upon the part of her said husband & for purposes therein specified.  Given under my hand and Seal of office this 22nd day of November 1869.                                     John S. Ratliff [seal]                                     Mayor of Verona & ex- officio                                     Justice of the Peace One name in the foregoing account needs explaining.  We do not know the identity of this “C. W. Cockerham.”  The last name is not very common in Mississippi, but it happens to be the name of a prominent family in Monroe Co.  The Cockerham house remains a historic home in Monroe Co.  The explanation we would now seek is to know why this C. W. Cockerham was a legatee of John Fisher.  In a separate deed of sale, Martha Ann Walker Fisher also conveyed her inheritance to her son Alfred:I Martha Fisher wife of the late John Fisher for a valuable consideration the receipt of I hereby acknowledge hereby relinquish all my Right, Title & Interest either in Law or Equity to within described Land being entitled to Dowers herby transfer my Right, Title, and Interest in the within described Lands to A. P. Fisher my son in consideration of full payment for said Dower.  Given under my hand and Seal this the 23rd day of November A.D. 1869.                                     Martha Fisher [seal] State of MississippiLee County      Personally appeared before me John S. Ratliff Mayor of Verona and Ex-officio Acting Justice of the Peace in and for the said county Martha A. Fisher, the author of the above transfer who acknowledges she Signed, Sealed & Delivered the within transfer for purposes therein contained.   Given under my hand and Seal of office this the day of November A.D. 1869.                                     John S. Ratliff [seal]

                   Mayor of Verona & Ex-officio Justice of the Peace

Having exhausted the best memories of what must have been a trying family transition, it now seems more profitable to turn to what is known of the Bolding origins.  The U.S. 1850 Census of Pontotoc, Mississippi, listed several Bolling families, but by 1860, these various families no longer had identical surnames.  This led to some speculation that perhaps they had had a family fight, or perhaps the War Between the States caused sharp differences between them.  It later became apparent that few if any of these spelled their names “Bolling” in the first place.  The census taker had simply decided to spell all the similar sounding names the same.  The discovery of other documents relating to James P. Bolding, the physician in that 1850 and 1860 census, supports the belief that he never spelled his name any way except “Bolding.”[75]

               Family lore and census records agree that James P. Bolding was born in Bowling Green, Kentucky.[76]  One of his grandsons, Harry R. Morse Sr., believed that Bowling Green was named for the Bolding family as does another family named Bouldin.[77]  It would seem more likely that it was named for a simple bowling green; however, local historians do not know the origin of the name themselves.  The identical family stories handed down about the town’s naming increases the necessity of not ruling out the unlikely.

We have not established a definite homestead for James P. Bolding’s parents in Warren Co., Kentucky, during 1812, which is the date of his birth there.  The town was brand new, having been established in 1810, and no specific Bolding family has been located there from census records.  A Bouldin family can be found in Warren Co., Kentucky census records as late as the 1820s, but no specific connection has been made yet to James P. Bolding.  They are the first family in the area found to have  a “d” in the name rather than the spelling of “Bolling.”  It seems a strong possibility that James P. Bolding was of this Bouldin family, as the name of a Thomas Bouldin shows up continually in Kentucky land records[78] beginning in the 1790s from sales to Virginia residents.  This Thomas Bouldin operated out of his home in Richmond, Virginia, and is not known to have actually lived in Kentucky.  A Bouldin family of surveyors is also known to have lived in Baltimore around this time.  Whatever the origins of the family of James P. Bolding, it is tempting to assume that they went to Kentucky without putting down deep roots.

After James P. Bolding started a household in Pontotoc Co., Mississippi, another man with the same name lived near him.  This elder James P. Bolding headed up a sizeable household and several of his children lived very near him.  James P. Bolding, the physician, however, was about 17 years younger than this elder James but lived noticeably farther from him than those definitely identified as the elder man’s children.  However, the physician lived even nearer to a Sarah Bolding, a widow whose relationship to him seems more probable by reason of sheer proximity.  Another unusual element bearing the earmarks of relationship is found in the household of the physician. In 1850, two women are listed among the household of James P. Bolding, physician, [Bolling on the census record] by the names of Sarah and Rachel West.  Both were born in South Carolina and were seventeen to twenty years older than James P. Bolding and his wife Elizabeth Fisher.  To this day, no one has uncovered the exact relationship between these West women and the Boldings.  By the next census in 1860, only one of these women was left in the household.  Notably, two of the Bolding girls (presumably the eldest) also bore the names Sarah and Rachel.James P. Bolding’s middle name remains a fascinating mystery.  Two possibilities have been suggested as the correct middle name.  Some believe the “P.” stood for “Platt,” but this seems far-fetched since the name occurred in Elizabeth Fisher’s line.  The second explanation seems more likely.  Years ago, James P. Bolding’s granddaughter Ann Morse Whitley told her family that the “P” stood for “Pleaz.”  She stated that it was short for “Pleasant.”[79]  This has given rise to speculation that he may have been related to another line of Boldings known to have given all of its children the middle name of “Pleasants” with an “s” on the end.  The shortened form of this was also “Pleaz.”  In fact, the name appears as a first name among many Bolling and Bolding families and is sometimes spelled “Plez.”[80]  Here is the generally accepted line of the couple who named all of their children “Pleasants”:  A. John Bolling/Bollen m. Mary Tarpley of Sullivan County, Tennessee.

      1. John Tarpley Bolding b. 10 Dec. 1778 in Henry Co., Va., m. Mary Pleasants.

a.       Mary Pleasants Bolding.

b.      James Pleasants Bolding.

c.       Marvin Pleasants Bolding b. 10 Nov. 1800.

d.      Joseph Pleasants Bolding b. 26 Nov.1802.

e.       William Pleasants Bolding b. 15 Dec. 1804, d. 25 Nov. 1807.

f.        Robert Pleasants Bolding b. 1 Oct. 1807, d. 26 Nov. 1807.

g.       John Pleasants Bolding b. 1 Jan. 1810.

h.       Sarah Pleasants Bolding b. 3 Feb. 1812.

i.         Anne Pleasants Bolding b. 3 Feb. 1812.

j.        Andrew Pleasants Bolding b. 27 Dec. 1813, m. to Mary Ann Patterson.

k.      Martha Meotaka Pleasants Bolding b. 5 Sept. 1815.

l.         Ara Amelia Pleasants Bolding b. 10 Aug. 1817.

m.     Elizabeth Pleasants Bolding b. 25 Dec. 1819.

Without delving unnecessarily into the depths of the controversy surrounding the correct number of children in this family, suffice it to say that the information on them came through a work by Judge Zelma Price, a retired lady who wished to make a family heritage gift to her descendants.[81]  Her work is considered a classic in some circles, but has come under some scrutiny in recent years.  The general consensus of opinion is that she got most of the names and relationships correct, but the birth years were sometimes off.  Nevertheless, this Virginia family produced a James Pleasants Bolding, said to have had a son with the same name.  This son has never been identified.

The first reaction is to wonder whether this Dr. James P. Bolding, the younger, could have been the son of the elder James of this line who later moved to Pontotoc, Mississippi.  Though not impossible, it seems unlikely that the elder James had a son at the age of 17, especially considering the wide gap in age between the younger James and the presumed oldest son of the elder man.  This has caused no little consternation to researchers.  We can at least be reasonably sure of the information we have on the descendants of James P. Bolding, the physician.

The Bolding Family Line

The children of James P. Bolding and Elizabeth Fisher are listed according to the best guess of their birth order.  The information herein came from a combination of various census data and family memory of the children’s nicknames.  Their nicknames were not used on the census records but have been matched to the best of our ability with the census names.[82]

A. Dr. James P. Bolding[83] b. 23 Sept 1812 in Bowling Green,[84] Ky., d. 25 Sept 1889 Hubbard City, Hill Co., Texas, m. May 1849 to Elizabeth L. Fisher[85] b. 22 Nov 1828 in Aberdeen, Monroe Co., Mississippi, d. 24 May 1906 in Hubbard City, Hill Co., Texas.

1.      Rachel C. Bolding[86] b. ca. 1857 Pontotoc Co., Miss.

2.      Mary “Mollie” F. Bolding[87] b. ca. 1856, Pontotoc Co., Miss.

3.      Martha Ann “Annie” Bolding[88] b. ca. 1852, Pontotoc Co., Miss., m. to Capt. William A. Wallace.[89]

a.       Frank Bolding Wallace.

b.      Albert Wallace.

c.       William Wallace.

d.      Raymond Wallace.

4.      Sarah “Sallie” E. Bolding[90] b. Sept 1853, Pontotoc, Miss., m. 5 Sept. 1877 to Winfield Scott Boggs[91] b. May 1850.

a.       Winfield Scott Boggs, Jr.[92] b. 1878.

b.      Elizabeth “Bessie” Amelia Boggs[93] b. May 1880 m. to Richard Beck.[94]

c.       [Balos] Sloan Boggs b. Feb. 1882.

d.      Annie Boggs[95] b. Sept. 188[6].

e.       Marshall K. Boggs[96] b. Dec. 1892.

5.      Cornelia “Neelie” E. Bolding[97] b. Pontotoc Co., Miss., m. 6 Dec. 1876 to James “Jim” T. Frazier.[98], [99]

a.       Albion Meredith Frazier[100] m. Stephana Allan.[101]

b.      J. Wallace Frazier[102] n. m.

c.       Nell E. Frazier[103] m. Bruce Frazier.

6.      Dr. Edmund “Ed” Randolph Bolding,[104] physician, d. 9 Oct 1915, n.m.[105]

7.      Loretta “Lottie” A.[106] b. Pontotoc Co., Miss.[107]

8.      Rosa Bolding[108] m. to [?].  Her daughter was Mary Dell[109] [last name unknown].

9.      [Susan] Amelia “Amy” Bolding[110] b. 9 Oct 1859 Pontotoc Co., Miss., d. 7 Apr. 1943; m. first James G. Taylor,[111] a pharmacist in Frost, Texas, who was killed on a train track in 1888 in Corsicana, Texas.[112]

a.       James Grestfield Taylor.[113]

b.      Dr. James Edwin Taylor.[114]

            Amelia Bolding m. secondly George Williamson Morse,[115] b. [1850] Hempstead,

            Texas.[116] His first wife was Helen Shoun and they had two sons

            named Elmer[117] and Claude[118] in addition to two girls, one of whom was named

            Nettie.[119]

c.       Harry Raymond Morse, Sr.[120] b. 3 Sept. 1896 m. 25 April 1923 to Rosey Lee “Rosalie” Woodliff[121] b. 18 Nov. 1900, Waco, Texas.

d.      Ralph W. Morse[122] b. about 1898.

e.       Ann Kathleen Morse[123] b. about 1894 m. Ernest Whitley.[124]

f.        Stanley Francis “Frank” Bolding Morse[125] b. about 1900.

10.  Fisher Bolding[126] m. but had no children.[127]

11.  Alfred “Alf” Bolding[128] n.m.[129]

12.  Della R. Bolding[130] b. 1872 Miss., a schoolteacher, n. m.

13.  William Bolding[131] d. as an infant.

14.  Robert “Bob” Platt Bolding[132] n. m.[133]

15.  James “Jim” Bolding[134] n. m.

16.  Charles “Charlie” L. Bolding,[135] the youngest, n. m., d. in Albuquerque, New Mex.[136]

The Boldings ended up in Hill Co., Texas, after first living in Navarro Co., Texas.  This power-of-attorney originated by James P. Bolding was discovered in Hill Co.

J. T. Balding[137]

to:

Power atty.  E. L. Russel.

The State of Texas Hill County.  Know all men by these presents that I, J. P. Bolding of said county and State have this day constituted and appointed and do by these presents constitute and appoint E. L. Russel my true and lawful attorney for me and in my name to cancel a promissory note on Record in the county of Lee State of Mississippi in the chancery clerk’s office of said county said note made by James Williams payable to the undersigned J. P. Bolding and calls for the sum of three thousand Dollars the same being the purchase money for the south east ¼ of section 1261 and the North West ¼ of the south West ¼ of sections 1251 all of township in Range 1.51 East.  Witness my hand and seal this the 22 day of June A.D. 1876.  [signed] J. P. Bolding, Esq.

The State of Texas,

County of Hill.

Before me the undersigned this day personally appeared J. P. Bolding to me known who acknowledged the execution of the foregoing instrument of writing to be his free and voluntary act and deed for the purposes and considerations therein stated bearing date June 22nd 1876.  In testimony whereof I J. M. Duncan clerk of the county court of Hill County herein sign my name and affixed my seal of office this 22nd day of June 1876.

                                                                   [signed] James M. Duncan [seal]

                                                                   Clerk Co. C. Hill County

The story of the Boldings ended in Hill Co. with the death of Dr. James P. Bolding.  He had no male grandsons to carry on the Bolding name.  Only the headstones of him and his wife Elizabeth Fisher survive as memorials of their lives.  They offer scant  clues about the couple they honor.  A Masonic symbol adorns the doctor’s headstone.  For some reason, the pedestal supporting it is turned sideways (probably by accident) and it reads, “A friend to his country and a believer in Christ.”  It calls to mind the funny stories that Amelia Bolding was said to tell, one of them involving a visit to a Methodist Camp meeting with her father.  She once remarked that her father stood up and declared, “I know that my Redeemer liveth!”  She swore his hair stood on end when he spoke these words, and no one has ever contradicted her account.[138]  Elizabeth Fisher’s headstone identifies her as “Wife of J.P. Bolding.”  Its inscription says:  “She was a kind and affectionate wife, a fond mother and a friend to all.”

The Fishers and the Boldings tie several family lines together.  In summation, they seem to have emerged from the Walker family of Virginia—a family that produced an unusual share of doctors with contacts both in America and abroad.  The Walkers had both English and Scots connections according to their allied surnames and intermarriages.  Among these surnames are MacMurdo, Ravenscroft, Haxall, Brodnax, Eppes, Munford, Bolling, Stark and Scott.  The Fishers and Boldings intermarried with a new mix of families after the War Between the States.  Names like Taylor, Morse, Frazier, McWhorter, Wallace and Cockrell began to creep in.  A few of these names will be examined in greater detail at some future date.


[1] “Muster Roll of Theodorick Walker’s Company, 13th Regiment of Dinwiddie Co., Va., 30 June 1813”,  in A Guide to Virginia Militia Units, in the War of 1812, comp. by Stuart Lee Butler (N.p.: Iberian Publishing Co., n.d.); Lee Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 14 (1933): 28, 31.  
[2] Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 28, 31.; U.S. Census 1850, Itawamba, Miss.; U.S. Census 1860 and 1870, Pontotoc, Miss.; Members of the Northeast Mississippi Historical & Genealogical Society, Lee County, Mississippi Cemetery Record, 1820-1879 (Columbus, Miss.: Blewett Co., 1981), 429. Two other sources for this information are said to exist: The Pegram Family of Virginia and Their Descendants by Samuel W. Simmons, p. 19; and Roll No. 17799 of the Society of Colonial Dames of the Seventeenth Century, neither of which I have managed to gain access to yet. 
[3] R. Bolling Batte Papers, Biographical Card Files: “Walker, J – Card 123 of 144,” Library of Virginia; Jordan R. Dodd, ed., Mississippi Marriages Early to 1825, (Orem, Utah: Precision Indexing Publishers, 1990), 37. 
[4] U.S. 1850 Census, Pontotoc, Miss. 
[5] “Rowland’s History of Monroe County, Mississippi,” from Mississippi: Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form, ed. by Rowland Dunbar, 3 vols. (Atlanta: Southern Historical Publishing Association, 1907) 273-76. Available on the Internet at: http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/Miss./monroe/history/monrrowl.Texast, last accessed 12 March 2003. 
[6] Dunbar Rowland, History of Mississippi: The Heart of the South, vol. II, (Chicago-Jackson: S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1925), 793. 
[7] Monroe County Book Committee, “John Dexter,” A History of Monroe County Mississippi. 
[8] Amelia Bolding Morse’s death certificate (No. 247, McLennan Co., Texas) refers to “Elizabeth Fischer.” I have found mention of baptismal records for her siblings on the Internet, placing their birth or childhood in Aberdeen, Monroe Co., Miss., but have not personally located any of these records. 
[9] U.S. 1850 Census, Pontotoc, Miss. 
[10] U.S. 1860 Census, Pontotoc, Miss. Although some researchers claim that both John and Martha Ann Fisher moved to Texas and died after the War Between the States, I have seen nothing to substantiate this claim. John Fisher’s name is missing on the 1860 census, indicating that he may have died by that time. The Fisher daughters married and lived in separate states—Mississippi, Florida, and South Texas.  Alfred, the only surviving Fisher son, went to Hill Co., Texas. No records for John nor Martha Ann Fisher have been located near the homes of any of their children in Texas. 
[11] Armstrong, Kerry M. “Was it James or John Allen?” Available on the Internet at: http://www.flash.net/~kma/allen.htm, last accessed 12 March 2003. 
[12] Armstrong cites: “Monroe County (Mississippi) DB 3, pp. 17-18.  An almost identical copy of the Deed of Gift can also be found in Pontotoc County (Mississippi) DB 3, pp. 196-97.” 
[13] Armstrong. “Was it James or John Allen?” 
[14] Ibid. 
[15] Armstrong says: “One of the problems that may have contributed to difficulty in determining the correct names of Betsy Love’s husband is that the records of the original lawsuits are contained in an “unmarked” volume of Monroe County, Mississippi, Circuit Court records. Therefore, the citation herein will be Fisher v. Allen and the page number(s).” From Armstrong’s footnote No. 19. 
[16] Armstrong footnotes Fisher v. Allen, 47. 
[17] Ibid., 46. 
[18] Ibid., 45-47. 
[19] Ibid., 48. “Vaughn stated that he traveled 198 miles to serve the papers on James Allen. It is supposed that this was the round trip distance.” 
[20] Ibid., 13-14, 45-47. 
[21] Ibid., 104. 
[22] Ibid., 104-108. 
[23] Armstrong, “Was it James or John Allen?”.  
[24] A historical work on John and Martha Ann Walker Fisher as Mississippi pioneers was published previously in a journal. Unfortunately, I have misplaced the information but believe it may be found again through a genealogical library service. 
[25] U.S. Census 1830, Monroe Co., Miss.; U.S. Census 1850, Pontotoc Co., Miss.; Deed of Gift, John Fisher to Elizabeth Bolding, Pontotoc Co., Miss., 10 June 1850; Lee Co., Mississippi L&P, DB 3, pp. 382-83, No. 897787, 13 Nov 1869; Lee Co., Miss., L & P, DB 3, pp. 382-83, 23 Nov. 1869; John Fisher v. James Allen, Monroe Co., Miss., Court Journal:[Journal not marked.], 23 March 1831; U.S. land patents, Monroe Co., Miss., certificate Nos. 18498, 29002, [2,311,555], 31167, and 8720 from the years 1835-44; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32.   
[26] U.S. Census 1850, Pontotoc, Miss. 
[27] Jordan R. Dodd, Mississippi Marriages: Early to 1825 (Oren, Utah: Precision Indexing Publishers, n. d.), 37. 
[28] U.S. censuses 1850 and 1860, Pontotoc Co., Miss.; Lee Co., Miss. L & P, DB 3, 382-83, 23 Nov. 1869; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[29] Only Nicholson’s account has Martha Ann Walker’s birthplace as Tennessee in “The Walker Family,” 32.  Census records indicate Virginia as her birthplace. Her parents, Maj. Theodorick Walker and Ann Scott Walker are believed to have left Virginia in the year following her birth. Nicholson has the other Walker children born in Tennessee, which makes sense as many families sojourned there before moving farther west.  However, I have heard that other sources give the other children’s birthplaces as somewhere in the Carolinas. 
[30] Marriage record No. 893399, Pontotoc Co., Miss., Marriage Bk. 6, p. 11, between Elizabeth L. Fisher and James P. Bolding, . 
[31] U.S. Census 1850, Pontotoc Co., Miss.; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[32] Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32.  
[33] These two girls appear to be known through the collective family memory. I cannot locate the original source, if any, in records. 
[34] Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[35] U.S. census 1850 and 1860, Pontotoc Co., Miss.;Robert K. Krick, The Gettysburg Death Roster: The Confederate Dead at Gettysburg, second ed., revised, (Dayton, Ohio: Morningside Bookshop, 1985), 49; United Daughters of the Confederacy Reference Dept., National Archive Microfilm No. 269, roll No. 67; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[36] U.S. Census 1850, Pontotoc Co., Miss.; U.S. Census 1870, McLennan Co., Texas; United Daughters of the Confederacy Reference Dept., National Archive, Microfilm No. 269, Roll No. 28; Lee Co., Miss. L&P, DB 3, 382-83, No. 897787, 13 Nov 1869; Hill Co., Texas land record, Fisher/Anthony, 8 Dec 1874; Hill Co., Texas land record, Fisher/William, et al., 18 Oct. 1875; Hill Co., Texas land record, Fisher/Morris, 8 June 1875; Hill Co., Texas land record, Fisher/Harris substitute deed, 5 Jan 1876; Hill Co., Texas marriage record with N.M.J. Davis, 23 Nov 1875; H. Grady Howell Jr., For Dixie Land I’ll Take My Stand!: A Muster Listing of All Known Mississippi confederate Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, 879. 
[37] The family did not recall that he ever married, but the discovery of this marriage record in Hill County opened up the question.  Ours is the only A. P. Fisher I am aware of in that county in 1875. 
[38] U.S. Census 1860, Pontotoc Co., Miss.; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[39] Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[40] Ibid. 
[41] Ibid. 
[42] Ibid. 
[43] U.S. Census 1860, Pontotoc, Miss. 
[44] Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[45] U.S. Census 1900, Maverick, Texas; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[46] Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[47] All of these children are mentioned by Nicholson in “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[48] Bobby Pepper, “A Thriving City from the Past,” Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, (Wednesday, April 10, 1996, section E, pages 1 & 10), republished by David A. Webb for “Richmond, Mississippi,” available on the Internet at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~unitycem/richmondjournalarticle2.html, accessed 19, March 2003. 
[49] U.S. 1850 Census, Itawamba, Miss.; U.S. 1860 Census, Pontotoc, Miss.; Members of the Northeast Mississippi Historical & Genealogical Society, Lee County, Mississippi Cemetery Records, 1820-1979 (Columbus, Miss.: Blewett Co., 1981), 429; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 35.  From notes by Dorothy M. Cross received from T. K. Griffis, Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Mississippi, of Free and Accepted Masons, Meridian, Miss., wrote that James P. Bolding was a charter member of Richmond Lodge No. 97, Richmond, Itawamba County, Mississippi, “He was probably a member prior to this time in another state, because this Lodge report does not show any degrees on him and they do not show him a member in Mississippi prior to that time. He was a junior warden in 1849 and in 1851 he demitted and affiliated with Harrisburg Lodge #156, Harrisburg, Pontotoc County and was junior warden as a charter member in 1851. He demitted in 1853, but reaffiliated in 1854 and remained a member there until 1863.” 
[50] U.S. 1850 Census, Itawamba, Miss.; U.S. 1860 Census, Pontotoc, Miss.; Members of the Northeast Mississippi Historical & Genealogical Society, Lee County, Mississippi Cemetery Records, 1820-1979 (Columbus, Miss.: Blewett Co., 1981), 429; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 35. 
[51] He was listed as a junior warden among the 1840 officers of the Richmond Lodge, No. 97 of Itawamba Co., Miss.  Richmond Lodge was not actually chartered until 17 Jan 1849.  James P. Bolding also appears as a member of this same lodge in 1845, which is the same year that A. H. Raymond served as a junior warden. Information came from “Facts of Old Richmond Town,” which came from a paper done by the WPA & a research project by Mrs. Mertice F. Collins, Mrs. Arcadia Morgan, and Mr. James Pettigrew, printed by the Genealogical Press in 1981. 
[52] “Facts of Old Richmond Town,” which came from a paper done by the WPA & a research project by Mrs. Mertice F. Collins, Mrs. Arcadia Morgan, and Mr. James Pettigrew. It was printed by the Genealogical Press in 1981. 
[53] Marriage license between James P. Bolding and Elizabeth Fisher, 4 May 1849, Pontotoc Co., Miss., Bk. 6, p.11, No. 893399. 
[54] Descent, of course, can only be proved collaterally through Platt Fisher (as an uncle) and not lineally because Platt had no children.  Many organizations such as Daughters of Union Veterans accept only lineal descendants.  In the case of the Confederacy, many of those who died never lived long enough to marry and have children.  For this reason, it is especially significant that men such as Platt be remembered in this way.   
[55] Col. W. L. Clayton, “Pen Pictures of the Olden Time,” Tupelo Journal, July 28, 1905, p. 1, last accessed 1 March 2003, available on the Internet at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/%7Eunitycem/penpictures072805.html. 
[56] Col. W. L. Clayton, “Pen-Pictures of the Olden Time,” Tupelo Journal, July 14, 1905, n.p., last accessed 7 April 2003, available on the Internet at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~unitycem/penpictures071405.html. 
[57] U.S. 1850 Census, Pontotoc, Miss.; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 35; Members of the Northeast Mississippi Historical & Genealogical Society Lee County, Mississippi Cemetery Record, 1820-1879 (Columbus, Miss.: Blewett Co., 1981), 428. 
[58] U.S. Census 1870, Pontotoc, Miss. 
[59] United Daughters of the Confederacy Reference Dept., National Archive Microfilm No. 269, roll No. 67. 
[60] This is a different Martin than the schoolmaster at Richmond, Miss. 
[61] “Jeff Davis Legion [Cavalry] aka 2nd Battalion Mississippi Cavalry (Martin’s)” from Dunbar Rowland’s “Military History of Mississippi, 1803-1898,” last accessed 1 March 2003 on the Internet at http://www.mississippiscv.org/MS_Units/Jeff_Davis_Legion.htm. 
[62] “Jeff Davis Legion [Cavalry] aka 2nd Battalion Mississippi Cavalry (Martin’s)” from Dunbar Rowland’s “Military History of Mississippi, 1803-1898,” last accessed 1 March 2003 on the Internet at http://www.mississippiscv.org/MS_Units/Jeff_Davis_Legion.htm. Platt was placed on the Co. B., Jeff Davis Legion, Cavalry, Mississippi Honor Roll by General Order No. 87, 10 Dec. 1864. 
[63] United Daughters of the Confederacy Reference Dept., National Archive, Microfilm No. 269, Roll No. 28. 
[64] The author meant to say “James” but apparently confused himself after a discourse about another man named Charles.  The name is properly changed to “James” throughout. 
[65] Harry R. Morse Jr., written account of the Bolding-Fisher family, date unknown. [Author’s note: My mother, Betty Morse Brogdon, always said that James P. Bolding was getting a shave in a barber shop when he looked out the window and saw Elizabeth Fisher playing “horsey” on a sapling tree with some other children.] 
[66] This is in error. They lived in the town of Verona which still exists. 
[67] R. Bolling Batte Papers, Biographical Card Files: “Scott, J-Card 186 of 192.” Library of Virginia. 
[68] R. Bolling Batte Papers, Biographical Card Files: “Walker, J-Card 122 of 144.” Also “Walker, A-Card 19 of 99.” Library of Virginia; Lee Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 14 (1933): 28. 
[69] U.S. 1850 Census, Itawamba, Miss. and U.S. 1860 Census, Pontotoc, Miss. 
[70] Lee Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine 14 (1933): 31. 
[71] Email from Donna Cross Beck to Kathryn L. Brogdon, speaking of her mother Dorothy M. Cross, 18 March 2003. 
[72] Lee Co., Miss. L&P, DB 3, pp. 382-83, No. 897787, 13 Nov 1869 
[73] Referring to Alfred Fisher, Elizabeth’s brother, probably as told by Amelia Bolding Morse. 
[74] Harry R. Morse Jr. to Dorothy M. Cross, n. d.
[75] This belief is supported by his marriage license in 1849 and the Masonic rosters pre-dating 1850. 
[76] U.S. 1910 Census, Curry Co., New Mexico, “Della R. Boulding” listing. 
[77] [Author’s note: I also ran across another family named Bouldin on the Internet who also believe the town was named for their family.] 
[78] The name of May, Bannister, and Co. appears on many Kentucky land deeds along with the name of Thomas Bouldin. This company must have begun its Kentucky operations beginning around 1794. Thomas Bouldin’s name is steadily associated with land deals concerning there from about 1818 to 1835. 
[79] The incident was remembered by Betty Rose Morse Brogdon. 
[80] [Author’s note: I have seen this name in both white and black families with Bolding/Bolling surname variations.] 
[81] Zelma Price, Of Whom I Came; Of Whence I Came—Wells-Wise, Rish-Wise, and Otherwise, 8 Vols., (N. p.: Self-published, ca. 1963).  
[82] The children’s ages taken from the U.S. Census 1880 of Navarro, Texas, are way off; however, the children’s names match up perfectly according to family memory of the later-born children of the Boldings. All other information matches what is known of the family that came from Pontotoc Co., Miss., after the War Between the States. 
[83] U.S. censuses 1850 and 1860, Pontotoc Co., Miss.; U.S. Census 1880, Navarro Co., Texas; membership record from the Grand Masonic Lodge of Waco, Texas; J. P. Bolding and A. P. Fisher deed, 18 Nov. 1869, Pontotoc Co., Miss.; J. T. [sic] Bolding power-of-attorney, 22 June 1876, Hill Co., Texas (Name in title is incorrect. Compare name throughout text.); James William and James P. Bolding promissory note for land, 20 Aug. 1869, Verona, Lee Co., Miss.; Priddy and Bolding land record, 26 Oct. 1882, Hill Co., Texas; marriage record with Elizabeth Fisher, May 1849, Pontotoc Co., Miss.; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32; Amelia Bolding Morse, death certificate No. 247, McLennan Co., Texas; J. P. Bolding headstone located in Fairview Cemetery, Hubbard, Hill Co., Texas; Bolling-Batte Papers at Library of Virginia. Also include his membership noted in Itawamba in Masons. A letter of condolence from the Grand Masonic Lodge in Waco, Texas, lists his date of death as 23 Sept. 1889 in contrast to the date on his membership record, which lists it as 22 Sept. 1889. Dorothy M. Cross verified his birthdate in her personal notes as 16 Sept. 1889, but I do not know where she found this.                James P. Bolding held memberships in various Masonic lodges, among them, Liberty Grove, Lodge No. 475 in West, Texas; Dresden, Lodge No. 218 in Dresden, Texas, and Hubbard City, Lodge No. 530 in Hubbard City, Texas. He was listed as a junior warden among the 1840 officers of the Richmond Lodge, No. 97 of Itawamba Co., Miss.  Richmond Lodge was not actually chartered until 17 Jan 1849.  James P. Bolding also appears as a member of this same lodge in 1845, which is the same year that A. H. Raymond served as a junior warden.  A. H. Raymond was the same man who owned a hardware store in Richmond until the railroads bypassed it in favor of Verona and later moved there.  His presence is significant in that he co-signed the marriage promissory note for Elizabeth Fisher and James P. Bolding in 1849.  He was Elizabeth’s uncle by marriage and the name Raymond has come down in his honor through various branches of the family. This Richmond Masonic information was taken from “Facts of Old Richmond Town,” which came from a paper done by the WPA & a research project by Mrs. Mertice F. Collins, Mrs. Arcadia Morgan, and Mr. James Pettigrew. It was printed by the Genealogical Press in 1981. 
[84] U.S. 1910 Census, Curry Co., New Mexico, “Della R. Boulding” listing. 
[85] U.S. censuses 1850 and 1860, Pontotoc, Miss.; U.S. Census 1880, Navarro, Texas; Elizabeth Bolding headstone located in Fairview Cemetery, Hubbard, Hill, Texas; John Fisher to Elizabeth Bolding deed of gift 10 June 1850, Deed Book 6, pp. 965-66, Pontotoc, Miss.; marriage record with James P. Bolding, May 1849, Pontotoc, Miss.; death certificate of Amelia Bolding Morse, file No. 247, McLennan, Texas; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32; Bolling-Batte Papers from the Library of Virginia. I have seen her obit but cannot now locate it, which had her date of death. 
[86] U.S. Census 1860, Pontotoc, Miss.; U.S. Census 1880, Navarro, Texas. 
[87] U.S. Census 1860, Pontotoc, Miss.; U.S. Census 1880, Navarro, Texas; Deed of Sale 17 March 1884, Hill Co., Texas; Priddy/Bolding land record 26 Oct. 1882; Attaway/Bolding land record 17 March 1884. 
[88] Believed to be Martha Ann, hence the nickname “Annie.” This is a logical assumption because Martha Ann Walker Fisher was her grandmother, and no Martha is known to have existed among the Bolding children, but only an “Annie.” U.S. Census 1860 Pontotoc, Miss.; U.S. Census 1880, Bexar, Texas; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[89] U.S. Census 1880, Bexar, Texas; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[90] U.S. Census 1860, Pontotoc, Miss.; U.S. Census 1900, Hill, Texas; marriage record with Winfield Scott Boggs; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32.  
[91] U.S. Census  1900, Hill, Texas; marriage record with Sallie Bolding, 4 Sept. 1877, Hill, Texas; marriage record with D. E. Pennington, 12 Nov. 1875; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. There are also numerous land records from Navarro Co., Texas, containing his name, which the author has not collected. 
[92] U.S. Census 1900, Hill, Texas. 
[93] Ibid. 
[94] Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[95] U.S. Census 1900, Hill, Texas. 
[96] Ibid. 
[97] Cornelia appears to be the same person as Elizabeth C. Bolding listed in the U.S. Census 1860, Pontotoc, Miss. Her birth order suggests this as she is one of the older Bolding children but does not appear in the 1860 census where she properly belongs.  Her given names may have been confused by the census taker.  Not only that, but the family does not recall an Elizabeth among the Bolding children of the day.  Children both older and younger than Cornelia are listed in 1860. Other records pertaining to Cornelia are the U.S. censuses 1880 and 1910, Hill, Texas; marriage record [date] with James T. Frazier, Hill, Texas; the obituary notice for Amelia Bolding Taylor Morse, Waco News-Tribune, 8 April 1943 (listed as “Mrs. J. F. Frazier”) [check this middle initial], and Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[98] Marriage record with Cornelia Bolding, Hill, Texas; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[99] Harry R. Morse Jr. to Dorothy M. Cross, n. d.: Aunt Neelie and her husband had two children, Nell and Albion.  Albion was a Washington, D.C. attorney and ran some program for President Roosevelt during the New Deal days.  Nell Frazier married Bruce Frazier, so her name didn’t change.  They had two children, Bruce Jr. and Cornelia who was named after her grandmother.  They lived on a ranch near Big Spring, Texas.  Aunt Neelie lived to be 100 years old, lacking just a few days.  After I got back to Waco in 1972, I went through Grandmother’s old trunk to help sort out what was in there and discard what was worthless in order to make more room.  There were many letters from Aunt Neelie written to Grandmother.  The main subject of the letters was that Bruce Frazier, her son-in-law, was going to get title to the ranch and she didn’t want that.  Evidently he had not been accepted as part of the family.  He did get title to the ranch, however, Nell outlived him and so she had the ranch.  She sold it and bought a nursing home with the proceeds which she ran along with Bruce Jr.  So in the end, it really didn’t matter anyway. 
[100] Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” Tyler’s 32. 
[101] Ibid. 
[102] Ibid. 
[103] She and her husband were personally known to Harry R. Morse Jr. 
[104] U.S. Census 1880, Navarro Co., Texas [given name in error]; land record of payment involving J.G. Taylor and Amelia [Bolding] Taylor to E. R. Bolding, 5 Feb. 1887, Navarro Co., Texas; land record of payment from E. R. Bolding to S. J. T. Johnson, Navarro Co., Texas; death record 9 Oct. 1915, Hill Co., Texas, but noted as living in Kansas City, Mo; Nicholson, “The Walker Family,” 32. 
[105] Harry R. Morse Jr to Dorothy M. Cross, n. d.: “In this family, there were five boys and about six (I am not sure of the number) girls.  Ed Bolding, the oldest son, became a medical doctor in Kansas City until he had his license revoked.  He was on dope.” Here I must make an explanation for such a blunt statement about the man.  Harry R. Morse Jr. explained to me later that Ed Bolding developed a degenerative illness of some sort from which he knew he would not recover.  He was apparently a surgeon of some renown who had developed sophisticated surgical tools.  When Morse asked his grandmother, Amelia Bolding Morse, about her brother, she did not say a lot, but he said he could see that “it weighed heavy on grandmother’s mind.”  The family story says that Ed Bolding was on heavy medication because of his pain, which was so great that he eventually committed suicide.  There is some speculation that he may have botched a surgery because of his deteriorated condition and was perhaps facing a malpractice charge, but this has never been substantiated.  The cause of death on his Hill Country death certificate appears to be a misspelling of the word “pyelo-nephritis which is plain old fashioned kidney failure,” according to one family researcher.That would not be at all uncommon for the time.  It was often a secondary effect of a strep throat.  Thestreptococcus bacteria (usually referred to as gram-negative streptococcus)that causes strep throat changes the lining of the kidney which results inkidney failure.  It is the same process that caused rheumatic fever whichdamaged the mitral valve.” [105] The only question left unanswered is whether or not the fact of a suicide would have been covered up by the editing of information that went into the death report.  We will never know. 
[106] U.S. Census 1860, Pontotoc, Miss.  The family knew of a “Lottie,” and Loretta is the only Bolding daughter whose name seems to go with the nickname.  Her name in the Pontotoc Co. census appears to be “Lousetta,” but after much comparison with other known records and ages of children, it appears that this listing cannot be other than Loretta.  She appears as “Loretta” in the U.S. Census 1880, Navarro, Texas. 
[107] Harry R. Morse Jr. to Dorothy M. Cross, n. d.: “I cannot remember the names of Grandmother’s [Amelia Bolding’s] other sisters though I think the name of one may have been Rose [it was Rosa] and another Mary [She was often called “Mollie”].  The daughter of one of them was named Mary Dell, but I do not know whose daughter she was or what her last name was.” 
[108] U.S. Census 1880, Navarro, Texas. This is the only place we have found a “Rosa” listed for the Bolding family; however, Harry R. Morse Jr. recalled her daughter Mary Dell whose last name he could not remember. 
[109] Harry R. Morse Jr. remembered meeting Mary Dell. 
[110] U.S. Census 1880, Navarro Co., Texas; U.S. Census 1900, McLennan, Texas; marriage record with James G. Taylor, Hill Co., Texas; marriage record noted by someone else under the name “A. B. Taylor” [Amelia Bolding Taylor] with G. W. Morse in Hill, Texas, but could not be located at last visit; death certificate No. 247, McLennan Co., Texas; headstone in Rosemound Cemetery, Waco, Texas; composer of two hymns, “Gesthemane” and “Meekly Bear and Murmur Not;” Navarro Co., Texas land record payment to E. R. Bolding, 5 Feb. 1887.  Amelia Bolding, according to time of birth and birth order, has to be the unnamed female child of James P. and Elizabeth Fisher Bolding on the U.S. Census 1860, Pontotoc, Miss. According to Harry R. Morse and Betty R. Morse Brogdon, Amelia Bolding’s daughter Ann Morse Whitley said that she believed Amelia Bolding’s first name was Susan but that she never liked to use it.  No record exists with this name.   
[111] Marriage record with Amelia Bolding, 7 January 1885, Hill, Texas; [land records noted in Navarro Co.] 
[112] Harry R. Morse Jr. to Dorothy M. Cross, n. d.: “Grandmother, Susan Amelia Bolding, was born in Mississippi and came to Texas as a young girl with her parents, brothers and sisters.  She was raised in Hill County.  Her father, Dr. James Bolding, helped to found Hubbard City, Texas, according to legend, where he is now buried.  Grandmother did not like the name Susan, so she called herself Amelia [She was often called “Amy,” but other members of the family called her “Aunt Mede”].  She had some advanced education. I cannot say how much, but enough to become a school teacher before she married James Taylor.  James Taylor was a pharmacist and, at the time of his death, owned a drug store in Frost, Texas.  Grandmother had two sons by him, J. Edwin Taylor and James G. Taylor.  The J. in the name of Uncle Ed stands for James, also.      “James Taylor [Amelia’s husband] was on a business trip to Corsicana, Texas, when he was killed.  He went there to buy supplies for his drug store.  He was walking down a railroad track in town and a switch engine sent some boxcars down the track a-sliding, without controlling them. James Taylor didn’t hear them and they hit him.  He didn’t die immediately, but several days later.  Grandmother was told about it and went to Corsicana on a hand car, pumped by two men, with her feet dangling over the side.  She was pregnant with Uncle Jim at the time, which is why she named him Jim, after his father.       “J. Edwin Taylor became Dr. J. Edwin Taylor of Denton, Texas.  He married Halle […] who was known to the family as “Gypsy.”  They had two daughters. . .     “James G. Taylor, Uncle Jim, Married Mary […] and was a cotton broker in Waco for many years, member of the New Orleans Cotton Exchange.  They had three daughters. . .” 
[113] U.S. Census 1900, McLennan, Texas (living with Morse family); obituary notice for Amelia Bolding Morse, 8 April 1943, Waco News-Tribune. 
[114] U.S. Census 1900, McLennan, Texas (living with Morse family); obituary notice for Amelia Bolding Morse, 8 April 1943, Waco News-Tribune. 
[115] U.S. Census 1860, Grimes, Texas (living with the Kewley family); U.S. Census 1900, McLennan, Texas; death certificate of Harry Raymond Morse Sr., McLennan Co., Texas. 
[116] Harry R. Morse to Dorothy M. Cross, n. d.: “After the death of her husband she [Amelia] sold the drug store and opened a millinery shop where she made and sole women’s hats, this also in Frost, Texas.  This is where she was when my grandfather, George Morse, heard about her and went to Frost for the purpose of meeting her.  Evidently the arrangement was mutually agreeable because they were married, probably in 1892 or 1893 or something like that.” 
[117] Harry R. Morse Jr. believes that Elmer served in the Spanish-American war, but records have not been collected. Harry R. Morse Jr. also remembers that Elmer became a bum later and died in a warehouse fire in Houston. Records still needed. 
[118] Harry R. Morse remembers that Claude was a professional gambler and also ran a trucking company in West Texas. He later moved to Colorado Springs and lost touch with the family. 
[119] Related by Harry R. Morse Jr.  These two girls later became schoolteachers.  Their father used the inheritance money from their mother to send them to school.  For some reason, they later sued him in court for having used the money in this manner.  The father and the two daughters never spoke to each other again. 
[120] U.S. Census 1900, McLennan, Texas [birth month is in error]; Social Security death index No. 451-03-4019, Texas; marriage record with Rosey Lee Woodliff, 25 April 1923, Waco, Texas, certificate No. 25; headstone in Rosemound Cemetery, Waco, Texas; U.S. Census 1900 McLennan Co., Texas; death certificate of Amelia Bolding Morse, McLennan Co., Texas, file No. 247; obituary for Amelia Bolding Morse, 8 April 1943, Waco News-Tribune, Waco, Texas. He served as a private in World War I (no records obtained yet but it is noted on his headstone). 
[121] Marriage record with Harry R. Morse, 25 April 1923, Waco, Texas; headstone in Rosemound Cemetery, Waco, Texas. 
[122] U.S. Census 1900, McLennan Co., Texas; Social Security death index No. 461-12-8535, Texas; obituary notice for Amelia Bolding Morse, 8 April 1943, Waco News-Tribune, Waco, Texas. 
[123] U.S. Census 1900, McLennan Co., Texas; Social Security death index No. 449-38-4353, Texas; appears in obituary notice for Amelia Bolding Morse as “Mrs. J. E. Whitley,” 8 April 1943, Waco News-Tribune, Waco, Texas. 
[124] Family knowledge, no record yet. 
[125] Social Security death index No. 550-03-3829, California; obituary notice for Amelia Bolding Morse, 8 April 1943, Waco News-Tribune, Waco, Texas. 
[126] U.S. Census 1880, Navarro Co., Texas. Fisher is said to have moved later to New Mexico. 
[127] Harry R. Morse Jr.: “Fisher Bolding I do not know too much about, but he settled in New Mexico near Clovis.”  This makes perfect sense as several Bolding children are said to have settled there.  Della became a school teacher in Clovis. Separate land records have been located for both Della and Bob Bolding in that area. 
[128] U.S. Census 1880, Navarro, Texas. 
[129] Harry R. Morse Jr.: “Alf Bolding was city marshal for Hubbard City [now Hubbard], Texas, until he got into a scrape that he thought would result in his being railroaded into prison so he just disappeared.”  This apparently had something to do with Alf shooting the son of a prominent member of society.  Alf was afraid he would not get a fair trial and took off for parts unknown. He thought that he had killed this other man but found out later that the man survived.  Another part of this story has Alf going to El Paso and serving as a sheriff in that county under the name J. B. Brown until he learned that it was safe to claim his identity again.  An investigation into law enforcement officers of El Paso County has not yet confirmed this.   
[130] U.S. Census 1910, Curry, New Mexico; U.S. Land Patent No. 341775, Tucumari, New Mexico.  Her surname is listed as “Boulding” in the 1910 census record. 
[131] There is no verifiable evidence of a William Bolding, but he has appeared on one listing on the Internet. 
[132] U.S. Census 1880, Navarro, Texas; Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records, Accession/Serial No. 1049716, BLM Serial No. NMSF 0048510, Torrance Co., New Mexico; Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records, Accession/Serial No. 1049717, BLM Serial No. NMSF 0052189, Torrance Co., New Mexico. 
[133] Harry R. Morse Jr.: “Bob Bolding was a hulk of a man who worked as a peace officer for many years.  He was hit over the head with a pool cue and wore a silver plate in his head for the rest of his life.  After that man hit him, he [Bob] flattened the man that did it and then went down to see a doctor to have himself fixed up.”  This story illustrates the bulldog determination that Bob is remember for.  “He also worked as a drover as did Fisher, now that I recall.  Bob also settled near Clovis, New Mexico.”  Bob was on a cattle drive once, and certain of the cattle kept running off.  He finally got so tired of chasing them, that the next time they started running off, he pulled out a gun and shot a half dozen of them dead.     Harry R. Morse Jr. remembers him as being a huge, fat man.  At one point, Bob’s younger brother Charlie is said to have remarked at a family meal, “Bob, if you don’t stop eating like that, you’re going to be the size of a house.”  Bob reportedly told him, “I’ll be as fat as I damn well please!”  Bob and Charlie apparently spent a lot of time arguing, but were the best of friends.  It is said that they once sat down to eat nice juicy steaks at a café when they got into an argument.  Bob threw his steak in Charlie’s face. They remained, however, the best of friends. 
[134] U.S. Census 1880, Navarro, Texas. 
[135] U.S. Census 1880, Navarro, Texas; Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office records, Accession/Serial No. 997306, BLM Serial No. NMSF 0042116, Torrance Co., New Mexico; obituary notice for Amelia Bolding Morse, 8 Apr 1943, Waco News-Tribune. 
[136] Harry R. Morse Jr. to Dorothy M. Cross, n. d.: “Charles [Charlie] Bolding was a fireman on a locomotive.  He was working in Mexico when the engine’s boiler blew up and threw him about 100 feet through the air.  He was also scalded.  The newspapers carried the account of the mishap stating that he was in a hospital in Mexico.  Suddenly, one day, Alf Bolding showed up at the hospital, having read about Charles in the newspaper.  He took Charles out of the hospital in Mexico and brought him back to the USA, putting him in a hospital in El Paso. . . .After his release from the hospital, Charles and Alf went to New Mexico and settled near Clovis where Fisher, Bob and Della. . .lived.  None of these were ever married except Fisher and he had no children.  When Fisher died he gave his property to Alf.  Eventually they all died and the property, all of it, belonged to Charles, the youngest.  Charles was on a visit to Albuquerque in the late 1930s when he was hit by a car and killed.  The property was divided up with some to all of Grandmother’s children and, I suppose, to the descendants of her sisters as well.  Aunt Ann [Morse] Whitley and Uncle Frank [Morse] were never paid for their share.  They refused payment, supposing that there might be mineral deposits on the property.  None was ever reported and when the man who bought the rest of it had paid taxes on it for ten years, it became his.               “Of those in New Mexico, the only ones that I ever met were Charles and Della.  I saw Aunt Della on two visits that she made and Uncle Charles once.  The only other sister or brother that I ever met was Aunt “Neelie” whose real name was Cornelia [Bolding] Frazier.  She lived in Hillsboro, Texas.  Her husband was a farmer but was quite frugal and accumulated quite a bit of wealth.  Aunt Neelie was quite frugal, too.  She used to make her own lye soap long after most people bought soap at the store, though it was not terribly uncommon in those days.  I can remember that Grandmother also made lye soap on several occasions.” 
[137] The originator’s name is misspelled but was corrected in the body of the document. 
[138] Related by Harry R. Morse Jr. 

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